Our lesson today was in the habits of fog in the San Diego area.  We took off for Point Loma this morning in clear blue skies, and as we parked and walked around the park at the end of Point Loma, the fog moved in… You’ll see what I mean…..

 

I am sure glad we had a GPS at our disposal for getting around.  I learned the main streets of San Diego quite quickly, but it still helped to have a GPS warn me of upcoming.  We have become with Mission Boulevard along the ocean, and Ingraham, which runs north and south to different sites on the bay, and then there’s the Pacific Highway that runs from the south end of town all the way to the north end… and Harbor Drive, connecting the city from east to west.  The major highways are THE FIVE and THE EIGHT… so funny how they use “the” before the highway numbers – Other roads we learned to use were Balboa, Rosecrans, and then there was Park Boulevard (getting us to Balboa Park and the zoo) … pretty easy place to get around.

SONY DSC

We head south for Point Loma, via Ingraham, take a road east, and catch Nimitz highway south, then finally onto Cabrillo highway, taking us to the very end of Point Loma… and indeed, it is a point of land.  The land rises a good many feet above sea level…. Which of course is why there was a need for a lighthouse at the end of the land….

 

We pass Ocean beach, the Sunset Cliffs, and enter the park at the end of the point.  We pulled into the first parking lot available to us and look west over the ocean… and here comes the fog I mentioned earlier.  From the west, the fog was almost up to the west side of the point – so much so that we couldn’t see the water at the bottom of the point … a good couple hundred feet below us…

SONY DSC

We walked the paved path up and around to the right, finding ourselves at different outlooks – lots of brightly lit fog (the sun, being the morning, was behind us as we looked west…)  There were plaques talking about the gray whales we had seen the day before… and a good bunch of information about how Point Loma was used as a defensive post during World War II, complete with radio stations and stands of cannons.

SONY DSC   SONY DSC

Then to the lighthouse itself…. This one was a bit unusual as it was just a few stories high.  We have seen other lighthouses that contain spiral staircases that climb a hundred feet or more… but that was because they were located at sea level… but up here on the high banks of Point Loma, we were already up, making such tall lighthouse construction unnecessary.  Along with the lighthouse itself, there was a small museum that described how the lighthouse worked, and how the keeper and his family lived there.

SONY DSC   SONY DSC

We watched the ocean to the east of the point… ships coming out of San Diego harbor passed by us – ships of all kinds, including small craft, touring boats, and some military ships.  The fog presented an interesting view – the ships came out of the bay past the jetty and entered the fog bank, creating quite an eerie image as they departed.  The air was filled with many military aircraft – we missed seeing a fighter jet by just seconds.

SONY DSC

We walked down the path to the visitors’ center and the statue of Cabrillo, who discovered the San Diego Bay.  There were even more views to take in, and then to watch the fog finally clearing the west side of the point… as we looked to the road we came in on, fingers of fog had started to cross over the point.

SONY DSC

We concluded our tour of Point Loma, took to the car and drove down to shelter island, where we sat and watched more ships go by …this time at ground level.  Unable to see the sunset, we headed home after another day of taking in the warm and sunny/foggy sights of San Diego.

Advertisements